Like crafting, insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different result.

Armageddon 1’s Crafting System

>inv
You are carrying:
a long length of bone

>craft length
You could make a bone longsword from that.

>craft length into bone longsword
You begin crafting a bone longsword from a long length of bone you are
carrying.
Tiny slivers of bone break off as you begin to work the brittle material.

>
You carve the bone into a longsword.

>inv
You are carrying:
a bone longsword

>l longsword
This medium-long blade has been honed down to sharpness on both sides,
creating a fine edge for slashing. The blade and hilt appear to have been
carved together from a single chunk of bone. A leather strap is wrapped
around the hilt for a better grip.

Nice. We took a very specific item, a long length of bone, and crafted it into a very specific sword – a bone longsword. Armageddon 1 is full of such recipes and while we have thousands of crafting templates, any variation requires an entirely new template be created with a very specific set of items to use.

However, in the real world, we often make the same thing out of various materials. Chairs are made out of wood, plastic, and/or metal. Clothing is made out of nylon, polyester, cotton, and silk with an assortment of buttons, cufflinks, and the like made from bone, plastic, and wood. Why can’t we have the same in game?

Armageddon 2’s Crafting System

One of the most important feature sets we wanted to include in Armageddon 2 was a system that would allow us to closely imitate the creation and building of things in the real world using a variety of materials.

We’ll start with a few quick examples then go over what’s happening. Let’s say I’m sitting at a table in my apartment, and pull out a chunk of obsidian and an antler I carved out of a carru’s carcass.

>inv
You are carrying an antler, and a chunk of obsidian.

>craft chunk:color into hilt
You have successfully created a black hilt.

>inv
You are carrying an antler, and a black hilt. 

>craft antler:color.material into short blade
You have successfully created a white antler short blade. 

>craft hilt:material.adj blade:color into short sword
You have successfully created an obsidian-hilted white short sword.

or, if we chose to go the other direction

>inv
You are carrying an antler, and a chunk of obsidian.

>craft antler:material into hilt
You have successfully created a bone hilt.

>inv
You are carrying a chunk of obsidian, and a bone hilt. 

>craft chunk:color.type into short blade
You have successfully created a black stone short blade. 

>craft hilt:color.adj blade:material.adj into short sword
You have successfully created a white-hilted obsidian-bladed short sword.

>l sword
A simple hilt made of white bone has been attached to a thick, obsidian
blade to form this roughly made short sword.

However, having looked over the sword, we decide that we don’t like the design and carefully take it apart.

>salvage sword      
You break down a white-hilted obsidian-bladed short sword into a black
stone short blade, and a bone hilt.

>inv
You are carrying a black stone short blade, and a bone hilt.

What if we wanted the sword to have a different short description? Not a problem:

>craft blade:type.adj hilt into short sword
You have successfully created a bone-bladed short sword.

or

>craft hilt:material.adj blade:type.adj into short sword
You have successfully created an obsidian-hilted bone-bladed short sword.

>l sword
A simple hilt made of black stone has been attached to a thick, antler 
blade to form this roughly made short sword.

As you can see, the new system allows two very important things:

  1. The ability to use different materials to produce the same type of item.
  2. The ability to customize short descriptions and have madlib-like main descriptions.

The syntax for customizable templates is as follows:

craft <item:attribute.attribute> <item2:attribute.attribute> into <template name>

You specify the items you wish to use and after the colon the attributes that will compose the short description. You separate attributes by periods, and the system figures out how those attributes should be tied together. Though the list isn’t complete and we will be adding more as time goes on, we currently have:

  • material: the specific main material that makes up the item (obsidian, granite, antler, teeth, agafari, silk)
  • type: the overall type of the main material (stone, bone, wood, cloth)
  • color: the color of the main material (black for obsidian, white for bone, whatever color of the silk)
  • adj: “having a” adjective (bone-hilted, obsidian-bladed, white-collared)

Templates and Materials

Armageddon 2 recipes are setup like templates. Each template has a set of crafting materials, with some materials being raw materials a la ores, stones, logs, bones, and the like and others being crafted materials like hilts, belts, hems, and poles. The player fulfills the needs of the template by supplying the appropriate materials and produces a final product. The final product can then be combined with other items in game as craft materials to produce still more things.

In Armageddon 1, item characteristics (such as weight) are arbitrarily assigned, with brittleness, flammability, and other such considerations not being taken into account. Armageddon 2 has data for each of the raw materials, and carries those along the process of creation, from building one item to the next. Therefore, if you have a sword with bone, wood, obsidian, and gems, those base materials and the amounts of each will be used to help determine cost, weight, brittleness, flammability and other such attributes.

Along with materials, the items that made them (should that be the appropriate case) will be kept around as well. In other words, if you have a sword and want the hilt back, you could carefully attempt to break the sword down and reclaim the exact same hilt to use with another blade.

Future Crafting Blogs

This blog was a sneak peek at the crafting system. We are working on it and adding more features and capabilities as we go along. Expect more crafting blog posts down the road pertaining to the following:

Crafting skills. We are taking the plunge and separating skills into materials and categories. Currently, Armageddon 1 only supports skills like sword making, club making, jewelry, so on and so forth. Armageddon 2 will have material based skills such as metal working, stone working, wood working, and bone working. A character’s abilities in those skills will combine with their abilities in sword making, jewelry making, axe making to provide a more realistic and sustainable crafting system. Don’t have wood around? That’s fine, pick up some bone to make your tools or weapons. No bone or obsidian in the forest to make an axe? Great, gather some wood and granite and build one out of them.

Engravings, etchings, dyes, and other ways of further customizing your created gear.

Tents and Houses. You will be able to build your own. They will be destructible.

9 Responses to “Like crafting, insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different result.”


  1. 1 Pale Horse July 15, 2011 at 2:51 pm

    *Fangirlyscream*

  2. 2 J. Lewis Williams July 15, 2011 at 2:52 pm

    Wow, wow-wow, wow…… wow.

  3. 3 CB July 15, 2011 at 3:45 pm

    Isn’t this like Atonement RPI’s crafting system where it can pass on a variety of variables which determine the craft?

    • 4 shinobiofarm July 15, 2011 at 4:18 pm

      I haven’t played Atonement, so I’m not sure. Armageddon 1 takes the items you pass in and compares it against the recipe to see if you can produce the item. You can also query the potential recipes by typing craft item1 item 2 item 3. So, in that way, Arm 1 has a system by which you pass in a variety of variables to determine the recipes possible. Armageddon 2 can do the same as Armageddon 1, but can also use an item’s base material makeup (the raw materials used to make it) and object classification (hilt, blade, pole, nail, screw) to determine what recipes are possible and give the player a multitude of ways to create new items. I hope that answers your question.

  4. 5 Voular July 15, 2011 at 3:55 pm

    Cool.
    – V

  5. 7 Morrolan July 15, 2011 at 6:03 pm

    Well, color me impressed.

  6. 8 Kankman July 18, 2011 at 1:14 pm

    Can I play now?

  7. 9 The7DeadlyVenomz July 31, 2011 at 8:50 am

    This is sick.


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